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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 482 (some duplicates have been removed)
they rarely use switch back it's incredulous. they feel it's a common experience in their muni experience as it is mine. now we will switch back to me. what i want to say one of the main findings in the report is the fact that out of all the transit systems we interviewed only one used switchbacks as muni does to -- >> can i interrupt you and ask you about that? >> yes. >> perhaps i missed it, but can you talk a little bit about the other jurisdictions that you spoke with? >> you know what we're going to have in jack's report -- he's going to talk about how we chose the other jurisdictions. >> great. >> and jack and i interviewed them together and some of the other jurors joined in on the interviews but our selection was based on the controller's report that compared systems and we selected the list from the controller and contacted those systems. we were also told that all of the systems in europe use switchbacks as a tool, so we took advantage of a vacation to contact three systems in paris, and speak to representative who knew about those three systems. we then confirmd that intervi
in the city. and using switchbacks as a tool muni is deliberately violating rider trust deciding one group of passengers who are riding a bus or train must disrupt their trip and disembark and wait for the next one so the vehicles don't clunk or another line can carry more passengers. in order to smooth traffic the bus or train leaves the route. it's two fold. it eliminates the late bus or train that is actually causing the clumping and so slow it's in way of the others on the line and it improves the on time record because the slow bus or train is no longer operating. it's great for muni. not so great for the left behind passengers. we're not sure when muni decided to deploy operational switch backs in its system but in early 2011 muni passengers began to complain about switchbacks that left them strandd and waiting on strange platforms in the city. according to their own statistics about 41,000 riders a month were left on the street because of switchbacks. we were told switchbacks were implemented in the absence of clumping whenever a bus or train was needod another run. this mean
to be a disagreement about the use of switch backs and maybe you can talk from your point of view why you use them and let's start with that. >> okay. i think in terms of knowing -- we don't get up in the morning and say we have a goal to switchbacks. they're service management technique or tactic to make adjustment to recover from a significant delay and for us, and this is when we talked about the grand jury report when we first were briefed on it our concern was this was a lost opportunity, a lost opportunity to talk about muni service. in other words, what are the things that cause delays? what are the things we need to be doing to improve on time performance from crew reliability? what are the specific actions? what are the specific things? that's what we wanted to have. the higher the on time performance the less runs that are missed, the less vehicles break down, there is a less of a need for switchbacks. switchbacks are a symptom to us or a tactic, not part of the problem, so when do we use them? we use them when you have a significant break down, delay in service, a delay that mig
and mammals. plastic bags -- ever year, we use and throw away millions of them. >> plastic bags are a huge litter problem throughout the world. >> we interviewed mr. bloomenfeld back in 2007 when san francisco became the first city in the u.s. to ban plastic bags. large stores were not allowed to offer them to customers. the ban was a success. so the city then voted to expand it to every store in town. now communities all across the country are hopping on the "ban" wagon. the day after rye, new york, passed its law against plastic bags, teens were handing out green alternatives. >> there are no more plastic bags going to be offered in stores, so we're helping people out by giving them reusable bags. >> reusable bags are considered the best alternative... >> wonderful. >> ...because even paper bags are bad for the environment. although they can be recycled, they still use up natural resources to make, and the manufacturing process causes pollution. >> it's completely useless to use something once and then throw it away. >> people who work to ban plastic bags say the new laws help reduce the
the battleground states that were so heavily fought over in the most expensive race in u.s. history. it was early this morning when the president appeared with his family, becoming the third consecutive two-term president we elected. not happening since the presidents jefferson, madison and monroe. president obama won both a decisive victory in both the electoral college. and here on the east, the nor'easter, a storm so fierce the governor of new jersey said it will move the state's recovery effort backward for a time. and here is a look at the skating rink we used as part of the coverage on election night. tonight, it is under a layer of swirling snow. back inside, we begin with what happened last night. the president's historic re-election to a second term. he is back on his way to the white house tonight, where kristen welker starts off the coverage. good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian, after the grueling election, the president returns back to the white house. and with the economy limping back to health, the stakes could not be higher. the president headed back to washington where
rolls to re-election and a second term, defeating mitt romney despite a weak u.s. economy and persistently high unemployment. >> investors cheer obama's re-election. equities trading high led by autos and health care stocks. >> democrats keep their hold of the senate and republicans keep their control of the house. >> there will be a tough challenge facing the looming fiscal cliff. >>> a very good morning to you. it's been a long night, but we have a result. >> yes, we do. let's get right it to. president barack obama capturing a second term in the white house despite the struggling u.s. economy. he did manage to win many of the same states he took in 2008 and nearly all the critical swing states, including ohio, virginia, and colorado. speaking to supporters in chicago just a few hours ago, the president congratulated his republican challenger on the spirited race and said there's plenty of work ahead to fix the country's fiscal problems. >> i believe we can seize this future together, because we are not as divided as our politics suggest. we're not as cynical as the pund
to study their standard operating procedures but note the claim that others are using procedures similar to muni. the jury answers "the jury approves part of the response about contacting peers. we hope that you contact those systems that were on our list. these systems are seen by the controller as being similar to muni, and have higher reliability and passenger ratings than muni. if muni is going to strife for improvement and go for systems that do not justify a failed mentality. audit muni funds. the audit has control of the funds and working on tep. as the preferred avenue for service. the jury appreciates muni's response. next is train staff for controlled center. muni says staffing is under way for fiscal year 2013 to be completed by the end of the fiscal year and new communications expected in 2015. the jury expects muni's response and the final recommendation is monthly surveys. muni disagrees with the monthly part. they say that are conducting quarterly surveys and will conduct annual survey and perform on board passenger survey in early 2013. the results will be on t
to u.s. leaders negotiating over the so- called fiscal cliff about the serious financial impact looming on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they
u.s. ambassador to pakistan the ambassador to the united states and former adviser to hillary clinton. hosted by the world affairs council of america, this is 45 minutes. [applause] >> is a great pleasure to be here with such a great panel, three ambassadors and one globally renowned journalist and scholars. so i've been told there have been a lot of questions about pakistan and afghanistan so far and i think we have a first-rate panel to start dealing with them. what i'm going to do in terms of focusing the discussion is i'm going to key off with questions to each of our panelists, one each and allow for a little bit of follow up and then i will open the floor to use and you will have more time to engage with them. let me begin with ambassador munter. you already got his bio, but i think in some ways he is almost uniquely positioned to provide us a very recent perspective on what pakistan looks like in the united states to official american advisers and diplomats and also the u.s. pakistan relationship during what was an exceedingly difficult and trying time which is no refle
and makes us so proud to welcome you home to see the next generation of military personnel who are coming both men and women, bringing their families and reuniting in san francisco. you honor us by coming here for fleet week. i have for you, bear with me. a plaque which i will find a small space on that large ship and every time you come, you bring sunshine in some fashion and you are always welcome here. thank you for your hospitality. thank you. [applause] >> if you will all indulge me for one more minute. on behalf of the mayor and my colleagues here today. i want to thank the fleet week committee under the vision of major general myatt. jodie breken ridge, catherine hooper and those i can't possibly remember to name. i know the major general is not a big plaque fan. but we want to show off our partnership and if you will allow me, i have a plaque for you as well. >> thank you. [applause] >> i appreciate that. thank you. >> thank you. so much. i want to thank admiral beaman for what he has done and continues to do for the city. during the 75th anniversary celebration of the golden gate
we have available to us today, our current assessment is that what happened in benghazi was, in fact, initially a spontaneous reaction to what had just transpired hours before in cairo, almost a copycat of the demonstrations against our facility in cairo which were prompted, of course, by the video. what we think then transpired in benghazi is that opportunistic extremist elements came to the consulate as this was unfolding. >> so there you have it. what do you think about that, and what role does that statement by her make in the concern about her qualifications? >> yeah. you know, chris, one of the things that's amplified some of the concerns around this is we had a classified briefing with about 65 or 70 senators on september the 20th, and i assure you if you were there, you would have thought it was one of the most bizarre briefings ever where we had four, you know, distinguished people there who shared like no information. i was in libya about a week after that. it was a preplanned trip. i didn't go there because of benghazi. obviously benghazi was a big topic, and i sat there w
as soon as they take the is stage in respective cities. good evening thanks for joining us. >> i'm carolyn johnson. president now has at least 275 electoral votes enough to serve 4 more years in the white hous house. >> abc news first made the projection-hour ago or so when the president won in the battle ground state of ohio and we can show you now the updated electoral college map so crucial to the process. again 2 70 votes needed to win. president obama after winning in key states like ohio has 2 81 electoral votes. again over the 2 70 to win. romney at this moment with florida stit still to be heard from and couple other states like virginia h2o 3 electoral votes. >> team coverage for you tonight. laura is live at mitt romney election headquarters in boston. >> and mark live in chicago at the obama headquarters and mark let's start with you there obviously an exciting time in chicago. >> half hour ago when they made the announcement this place erupted. reminded me of 4 years ago in grant park. let me show you the crowd, mike move up to the front of the little riser spac
before when the early voting numbers look good for us. >> you thought it long before the election. i know that. [laughter] >> but i was pretty sure -- >> how long? could he have one after the first debate or where the forces in motion? >> sure, absolutely he could have one. -- won. it was competitive the entire way. i think governor romney could have one up until the end. i always believe in the fundamental truth, we were building the best grass roots campaign in modern political history. we had the best candidate and the best message. >> in a way, the story of this election is the degree to which replicated the 2008 results. many people thought that 2008 was a once-in-a-lifetime result. you came very close to replicating it. i think the most fascinating statistic is african-americans in ohio, 11% of the electorate, 15% this time. you found 200,000 more african- american voters who turned out for you. mitt romney lost the state by 103,000. that was the election, right there. finding those extra african american voters. >> let me back up. we won this election because of barack obama. peopl
to go through one formal is much better for all of us. it is much easier to get a handle on what is going on. aou, we are doing really well with that. we will look into that and have it going through direct. >> so, we used all of these out. does anyone else have a question? we have about five more minutes before we take a break. i know the you are tired. please, ask and be polite. robbie? [laughter] >> hello. this is a question for all the panelists. given that we now have an entertainment commission, according to the economic impact study, in the last three years to four years, we have lost the north beach jazz fest. power to the peace canceled for the second year in a row. and we lost the love fest. is outdoor entertainment, those sort of events, is there a crisis there that we are collectively ignoring? what can be done to fix it? thank you. [laughter] [applause] >> i will answer that. sure. i think that each event is as strong as the people behind it, quite frankly. what we can do, obviously, breaking out, we can do some that -- some best practices. some people have been adam
and gentlemen, the fire boat phoenix. long may she serve san francisco. next is line is the u.s. navy guided missile destroyer, the u.s.s. rebel. equipped with the aegis combat system. it was commissioned in 2002 and deployed last year from san diego as part of the ronald reagan strike group. it was one of first ships to provide humanitarian assistance following the earthquake and tsunami in japan. the first responder, the rebel embarked navy helicopters surveyed the coast line to provide an aerial perspective for the damage to other ships for relief efforts. after hearing first hand from survivors, the crew volunteered to provide assistance. during deployment also conducted counter piracy patrol to enforce exclusive zones in the region. should ship's names sake, edward rebel served in the revolutionary war and searched in a bold complain against pirates and helped shape the fighting spirit that has been characteristic of the u.s. navy. the u.s.s. rebel is the sixth ship to bare the next time. there's 9217 tons and can sail in excess of 30 knots. there's 30 officers and 270 enlisted personne
ocean. the closest to us is down in florida along the atlantic coast line there. that's it. i mean, we're clear as a bell. it's a really nice morning. temperatures are in the 30s. what about the weekend? what about the week leading up to thanksgiving? it's in the forecast. >>> our big story this morning. baltimore city police pull a body out of the inner harbor. >> this morning police identified the body as a johns hopkins neurology professor. ky reed tells us investigators are hoping an autopsy will help provide some answers as to what happened to elizabeth ohern. >> according to her facebook pages she was a faculty member in the neurology and neuroscience departments at johns hopkins school of medicine. now, investigators are hoping an autopsy will explain why the 53-year-old woman was found floating off a pier in canton thursday. someone spotted the woman's body floating face down in the water near the 2300 block of boston street at about 4:45 in the morning. ohern lived in a gated commune not far from where her body was discovered. >> it's pretty random. >> neighbors say they're es
before we did the plan, the u.s. was a system of mexico with $36 million. here we are, this neighbor that's so important to us, we're assisting. at the same time, the united states will give 25 #% of all the foreign aid that we do, a lot of money. israel, egypt, pakistan, iraq, and afghanistan. nothing wrong with that, but we have to work with our frens to the south. we put in 1.4, and with additional money, it's $1.9 billion. for every one dollar we help with mexico, they spend $13. they spend a lot of money on security. they got to -- we got to understand what they are doing. now, what we started off, we did the easy thing, buy them hell cometters, buying this, and e worked with george bush, and filed the first legislation before bush talked about the plan because i felt that strongly about helping mexico, but nevertheless, we worked together. we did the easy thing with mexico, the helicopters and the planes. the hard part is this is we got to start training or billing the capacity, the prison systems, the prosecutors, the policemen. we're working on it at the federa
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
'm christine romans. a painful election is behind us. now the hard work begins. creating middle class jobs. it used to be a ticket to the middle class was by making things. but what are we making these days, and where is the middle? take a minute to look around your living room. your tv, the jaens you're wearing, the lamp next to you, all of those things likely aren't made in the usa. it's a trend, of course, long in the making but made worse by the great recession. when more than 2 million manufacturing jobs were lost. since june 2009 when the recession ended, just 241,000-of-those manufacturing jobs have come back. that's according to government data. for years, for years, conventional wisdom was we don't need to make stuff here. we'll invent it in america and then become a service-based economy. well, here we are, and these new service sector jobs aren't paying off, literally. right now a job in the leisure and hospitality sector averages $13 an hour. that's $27,000 a year, if you work full-time. retail, not much better. average hourly rate, about $16 an hour. this is the average. it ta
to an extremely urbanid and mobile population. in the u.s., many urban areas are characterized by diverse cultures, which create a rich ethnic mosaic. oufocus is boston, massachuse, part of a megalopolis located on the northeastern seaboa othe iteds. macaciopulio part of a megalopolis locahave taken root in older seainner-city neighborhoods. in recent decades, these neighborhoods deteriorated, with a downward spiral in infrastructure, services and opportunities. bunow stons bouncing back. with a downward spiral we'll see how relative location to the central business district, or cbd, is important to the development of these neighborhoods-- how so much can ride on their being part of federally-funded enterprise zones and how geographic information systems, or gis, can be used in addressing some difficult urban economic and social issues. boston, massachusetts. once a great port, it's now a world leader in high tech, higher education, bmedicine and finance. but like most u.s. cities, boston lost many jobs and middle-class residents to the suburbs. it's a regional problem-- part of the widening gap b
have>> good morning. thank you for joining us. i am heather childers. >> i am heather nauert. thanks for getting up with us and watching "fox & friends first". >> cheers turning to screams of panic at a texas parade honoring wounded veterans. a hoar wide crowd watching as a train slams full speed into a float carrying soldiers and their spouses. four people are now dead this morning and as many as 17 others injured. >> the gate started coming down, the truck tried to blow its horn to get the other people in front of him out of the way. the gates actually hit the first people on the trailer. >> a preliminary investigation saying the crossing gate and the lights were in fact working. it is unknown if the train crew saw the float approaching. >>> israel appears to be on the verge of an all out ground war with hamas. israeli troops and tanks in tel aviv for the first time since 1991 pounding suspected militant across rocket attacks that left three dead. protesting outside of the consulate. we will have a live report in the next hour. >> extending the deadline to establish the hea
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
.c. darcy spencer joins us live with the breaking developments. darcy? >> reporter: jim, i just got off the phone with the d.c. police and i can confirm that an arrest has been made in this case. we're awaiting additional details. but i can tell you the suspect's name is tieran mcelraft, arrested today, just 18 years old, on burglary one. that involved burglary where an assault was involved in that. the victim just 81 years old. police returned to the scene here on mckinley street around 45 minutes ago to collect additional evidence. this crime happened somewhere between 11:45 yesterday morning and 12:30 in the afternoon. the victim, she is blind and she is hard of hearing. the suspect apparently got into her home through a broken basement window. then there was some sort of encounter between that suspect and the victim inside her home. at that point they tell us that she was punched in her head and face. now, yesterday she was found by a mailman here. and he indicated she was barely kpgs. and she was confused. right at her own doorstep. >> the nature of the crime is a heinous crime, a
at the cincinnati inquirer. the headline, it's all up to us. ohio at the center of the political universe. while this state may, in fact, be important, it wasn't the first to vote. for the first time ever and with its lowest turnout in almost 50 years, a tie this morning in tiny dixville, notch. just after midnight they cast 5 votes for president obama, 5 for governor romney. a few hours south in manchester the governor ends his campaign. >> the last months of our campaign have seen the gathering of strength of a real movement across this country. it's evident in the size of these crowds like this tonight. my goodness. and i understand that there are a few thousand people outdoors that couldn't get in too. >> reporter: after voting near boston this morning, the governor hit the road again thanking campaign workers in pennsylvania and ohio, two key states he hopes to win. president obama wakes up this morning back home in chicago. he plans to continue an election day tradition. a game of basketball before watching results tonight. last night his final campaign rally ever. in iowa, where he first
'easter, affecting us wednesday and thursday. this is what we can expect planning today. lunchtime 48 degrees, 50 and breezy by 3:00 p.m. >>> the race for the white house is nearing the finish line. >> president barack obama and governor mitt romney are focusing on states expected to decide the outcome and barn storming since friday. >> t am on is in boston. >> reporter: good morning, today is the final day of campaigning, both sides say they can win. mitt romney hits up five states today. republican challenger, mitt romney, is closing the campaign, promising voters bipartisanship and real change. >> i will find the men and women on both sides of the aisle, who care more about the country than they do about politics. with polls showing the race a dead heat the campaign is focused on turnout, at this field office in ohio, volunteers call a list of voters who think they lean republican and others knock on doors. >> i haven't made up my mind yet. >> reporter: enthusiasm among the base and strength will carry them to victory tomorrow. there is the reality of the math. without ohio, romney's path to v
after 5:00. clear to partly cloudy, the storm missing us to the south. that guy west of st. louis, that is going to be wednesday into thursday's nor'easter with rain and an outside chance of a little snow here wednesday night. temperatures in the 30s in many areas, oakland is down to 28. fredericksburg, 39 degrees this morning. so expect sunshine, certainly a jacket needed today with mid- 40s from hagerstown. 51 in fredericksburg and 52 here in the district. monika samtani, how is our traffic looking? >> really good for a monday morning. but again, it is a monday morning. at least if you head out the door early you don't have the big delays to worry about. coming in on 66 your lanes are open from centerville to fairfax. same story in herndon, reston and right on down the line to tyson's corner. west side of town, this is what it looks like from bethesda, all your lanes on ep. this time we'll head over to the other side, no issues at all. looking good as you leave new carrollton down to the wilson bridge and we'll take a live look at the beltway down south. and beyond into alexandr
. u.s. equity futures should be interesting to look at temperature basically on hold. not sure what to do after yesterday. we'll talk more about the economy in a minute with david rosenburg. it was pretty clear yesterday that depending on how you wanted to spin it, could you say how do you do for another four years. i don't remember any euro news in the last six months no matter how bad it was, we didn't get it free handle. so there's more to it than just europe. >> it was the fiscal cliff, but also the financials got hit so hard. if it had been romney, the cliff would be less of a deal because they would stepped all of them. so now we know and we lettered it first hand yesterday. boehner said we're open to tax increase, but part of a bigger plan that involves spending cuts. dove did a bungee -- >> worst thing i ever did. >> but it goes down and then right back up. >> the worst part is you feel like you're connected on something, but don't. it's a free fall until the very he said and then he start to feel like i'm connected to something and it throws being back into the air. >> my q
us? we been halted by the long, but this time of what to document every step of the way. one of my triplet sons was taken out of football because of concussions years ago. now knowing what i know, the game can be made safer. the game is being made safer. so very quickly what we did is we parachuted into oklahoma. we've been following 18 for the entire season. we started in february at each monthly visit them for a week. we've been filming them. their concussion rate has plummeted to we put together our risk management program, 15 different steps. we have a celeron matters, hit sensors on their helmet at the high school level, so we are tracking heads. we are tracking everything that these boys walk we been able to get them. no helmets, not just a correct fit but how to measure it. most import message i have is that the kids want these ether and their helmet or as an earbud or mouthpiece. they want that responsibility taken away from themselves. so right now they are underreported and this this is really helping. >> let me bring bill maher to this conversation. as we mentioned as an
could get rain and snow. storm-team 4 meteorologist veronica johnson will tell us how much and when. >>> but first, decision day after months and months of campaigning. billions of dollars spent. the election is finally here. the final push that could decide the course of the country for the next four years. this is it. good afternoon, everybody. i'm jim handly. >> i'm pat lawson muse. we are on the trail with president obama and mitt romney. and we're also watching the polls in your neighborhood. we begin with news4's adam tuss in battleground virginia. he joins us live. the lines have been long today. >> reporter: here at this polling place, the line has been about two and a half to three hours long all day. right now, it is moving. that's the good news. it still stretches down the hill and then has to go into the building. waiting to be a part of history. some in the cold shade dance a jig to stay warm keeping the feet moving. once inside the door, greeted by reality again. the line here snaking around corners. twisting and turning before the finish line finally in sight. >> it h
will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san fra
to the streets this weekend. >> now that we know who our president is and what he's willing to do for us, we are even more excited about getting him re-elected. >> this morning we hit 600 houses. this afternoon we probably hit about 20 or 0 houses. not everybody was home but enough people were home that we were able to spread the word. >> woodruff: we assess the polls and the state of the race on election eve with stuart rothenberg, susan page, and andrew kohut. >> ifill: lawyers gear up to monitor polling stations tomorrow. what will they find? jeffrey brown takes a look. >> woodruff: and from legalizing marijuana to gay marriage and taxes, we break down ballot measures worth watching. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: all its own. with united health care, i got help that fit my life, information on my phone, connection to doctors who get where i'm from and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never miss a beat. >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in n
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 482 (some duplicates have been removed)